Case Study of Biodefense R&D Coordination and Implementation

10:10 AM - 11:55 AM

Room C


Abstract:
How do you prioritize biodefense R&D resources and investments across the Federal Government? What strategies can be used to maximize impact while reducing costs? Explore how the Biological Defense Research & Development community informs and implements biological defense strategies across disparate branches of government. Hear viewpoints on strategic planning, coordination, and implementation from laboratories to agencies.

Presentations:

Paula Bryant,

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH:

will discuss NIAID’s role--specifically the Office of Biodefense, Research Resources, and Translational Research--in medical countermeasure development for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases, to include the mechanisms used to access and assess expertise, innovations, and platform technologies in the private sector; what type of services we have available for researchers who need help translating their discoveries into products; and how NIAID uses all of the above to develop medical countermeasures for the known threat versus responding to an emerging infectious disease or outbreak.


[presenter materials]

George Korch,

National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, DHS:

will discuss how NBACC and other laboratories at the Fort Detrick represent locations where Federal partnerships are occurring to coordinate biodefense S&T.

Richard Schoske,

Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA):

will provide a basic overview of DTRA’s role in S&T for biodefense and in addressing the future threats.


[presenter materials]

Gerald Epstein,

NDU:

Gerald Epstein will provide a historical review of White House biodefense strategies and how they involve science and technology.



Discussion Questions:

  • How well do we plan for long-range needs? How do we address long- based threats? How do you maintain core capabilities while rapidly developing new capabilities to address future needs?
  • What are the opportunities that might be available to entities outside of the federal structure to assist in filling strategic gaps?
  • Does the biodefense community approach that you describe translate well into other domains?
  • Is there a need for a national strategy document for every type of S&T endeavor in which the USG would choose to invest, and how might I be able to influence that document?
  • What are future opportunities for national coordination on strategic planning across government? with industry?